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BMC Nephrol. 2016 Jun 6;17(1):55. doi: 10.1186/s12882-016-0268-9.

Electrolyte disturbances and risk factors of acute kidney injury patients receiving dialysis in exertional heat stroke.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Phramongkutklao Hospital and College of Medicine, 315, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand. satirapoj@yahoo.com.
2
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Phramongkutklao Hospital and College of Medicine, 315, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is a life-threatening illness and leads to multi-organ dysfunction including acute kidney injury (AKI). The clinical significance of abnormal electrolytes and renal outcomes in ESH patients has been poorly documented. We aim to exhibit the electrolyte abnormalities, renal outcomes and risk factors of patients with AKI receiving dialysis in EHS.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort study in EHS patients between 2003 and 2014 were conducted. Clinical and laboratory outcomes including serum and urine electrolytes, AKI and dialysis were assessed on admission, during hospitalization and at the time of their discharge from the hospital. A logistic regression analysis was performed for risk factors of acute dialysis.

RESULTS:

All 66 subjects with mean age 22.1 ± 4.3 years were included. On admission, the common electrolyte disturbances were hypokalemia (71.2 %), hypophosphatemia (59.1 %), hyponatremia (53.0 %), hypocalcemia (51.5 %), and hypomagnesemia (34.9 %). Electrolytes depletion was confirmed as renal loss (potassium loss; 54.2 %, phosphate loss; 86.7 %, sodium loss; 64.7 % and magnesium loss; 83.3 %). During hospitalization ranging from 2 to 209 days, 90.9 % patients suffered from AKI with 16.7 % receiving acute dialysis, and 3 % patients died. At discharge, AKI and electrolyte abnormalities had dramatically improved. The prognosis factors for AKI receiving dialysis were identified as neurological status, renal function and serum muscle enzyme at time of admission.

CONCLUSION:

The study suggests that hypoelectrolytemia and AKI are frequently observed in patients with EHS. Neurological impairment, impaired renal function, and increased serum muscle enzyme should be considered risk factors of acute dialysis.

KEYWORDS:

Acute kidney injury; Exertional heat stroke; Hypokalemia; Hyponatremia; Hypophosphatemia

PMID:
27267762
PMCID:
PMC4895821
DOI:
10.1186/s12882-016-0268-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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