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Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis. 2016 Jun;133 Suppl 1:S25-30. doi: 10.1016/j.anorl.2016.01.011. Epub 2016 Jun 3.

Hearing-related quality of life outcomes for Singaporean children using hearing aids or cochlear implants.

Author information

1
SCIC Cochlear Implant Program, an RIDBC Service, The Australian Hearing Hub, Ground Floor, 16, University Avenue, 2109 Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: Valerie.looi@scic.org.au.
2
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The Children Using Hearing Devices Quality of Life Questionnaire (CuHDQOL) is a new parent-administered hearing-specific questionnaire for children fitted with hearing devices. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes for hearing-impaired children in Singapore using this measure, as well as to examine its applicability for use in a clinical setting.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The CuHDQOL has 26 items, uses a recall period of 1 month, and is divided into three sections: parental perspectives and expectations (eight items), impact on the family (eight items) and hearing-related quality of life (QOL) of the child (10 items). Responses are made on a 5-point Likert scale, and transformed to a score from 0-100. Twenty-two parents of children with hearing aids and 14 parents of children with cochlear implants completed the CuHDQOL.

RESULTS:

The mean total CuHDQOL scores was 62/100 for the children using hearing aids and 53/100 for children with cochlear implants. Scores for the children using hearing aids were higher across all subscales, with a linear regression showing this to be significant for the parental perspectives and expectations subscale (B=-10.58, P=0.041). Analyses of Variance showed that both the 'Parent Perspective and Expectations' and the 'Hearing-related QOL' subscales were significantly higher than the 'Impact on Family' subscale for both groups (P≤0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

The CuHDQOL was found to be a simple, efficient questionnaire that could easily be incorporated into clinical practice to provide a more holistic evaluation of a child's outcomes post intervention, and/or to monitor their progress over time.

KEYWORDS:

Cochlear implants; Hearing aids; Hearing-impaired; Outcomes; Quality of life

PMID:
27267231
DOI:
10.1016/j.anorl.2016.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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