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Res Microbiol. 2016 Oct;167(8):638-646. doi: 10.1016/j.resmic.2016.05.005. Epub 2016 Jun 3.

Sulfate as a pivotal factor in regulation of Serratia sp. strain S2B pigment biosynthesis.

Author information

1
Molecular Biotechnology Lab., Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454, Iran.
2
Molecular Biotechnology Lab., Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454, Iran; Institute of Biotechnology, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran. Electronic address: karbalaei@shirazu.ac.ir.

Abstract

In the present work, we investigated the prodiginine family as secondary metabolite members. Bacterial strain S2B, with the ability to produce red pigment, was isolated from the Sarcheshmeh copper mine in Iran. 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed that the strain was placed in the Serratia genus. Pigment production was optimized using low-cost culture medium and the effects of various physicochemical factors were studied via statistical approaches. Purification of the produced pigment by silica gel column chromatography showed a strong red pigment fraction and a weaker orange band. Mass spectrometry, FT-IR spectroscopy and (1)H NMR analysis revealed that the red pigment was prodigiosin and the orange band was a prodigiosin-like analog, with molecular weights of 323 and 317 Da, respectively. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity studies confirmed their membership in the prodiginine family. Analysis of the production pattern of the pigments in the presence of different concentrations of ammonium salts revealed the role of sulfate as an important factor in regulation of the pigment biosynthesis pathway. Overall, the data showed that regulation of the pigment biosynthesis pathway in Serratia sp. strain S2B was affected by inorganic micronutrients, particularly the sulfate ions.

KEYWORDS:

Prodiginine biosynthesis; Prodigiosin production optimization; Serratia marcescens; Sulfate effect

PMID:
27267183
DOI:
10.1016/j.resmic.2016.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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