Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Radiol Clin North Am. 2016 Jul;54(4):689-710. doi: 10.1016/j.rcl.2016.03.006.

Cardiac Lymphoma.

Author information

1
Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA; American Institute for Radiologic Pathology, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Silver Spring, MD, USA. Electronic address: afrazier@acr.org.

Abstract

Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac neoplasia; Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD); Primary cardiac lymphoma; Primary effusion lymphoma

PMID:
27265603
DOI:
10.1016/j.rcl.2016.03.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center