Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Exp Child Psychol. 2016 Sep;149:134-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.017. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Reprint of: Equal egocentric bias in school-aged children with and without autism spectrum disorders.

Author information

1
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Section Clinical Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. Electronic address: s.begeer@vu.nl.
2
Department of Psychology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, British Columbia V3W 2M8, Canada.
3
Department of Psychology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, British Columbia V3W 2M8, Canada; Albert Ludwigs University, Freiburg, Germany.
4
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Section Clinical Developmental Psychology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Egocentric bias is a core feature of autism. This phenomenon has been studied using the false belief task. However, typically developing children who pass categorical (pass or fail) false belief tasks may still show subtle egocentric bias. We examined 7- to 13-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n=76) or typical development (n=113) using tasks with a continuous response scale: a modified false belief task and a visual hindsight bias task. All children showed robust egocentric bias on both tasks, but no group effects were found. Our large sample size, coupled with our sensitive tasks and resoundingly null group effects, indicate that children with and without ASD possess more similar egocentric tendencies than previously reported.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Autism; Egocentric bias; False belief; Hindsight; Theory of mind

PMID:
27262614
DOI:
10.1016/j.jecp.2016.05.017

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center