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Surgery. 2016 Sep;160(3):591-8. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2016.03.034. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Student perceptions of a simulation-based flipped classroom for the surgery clerkship: A mixed-methods study.

Author information

1
Goodman Surgical Education Center, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA. Electronic address: cara.liebert@stanford.edu.
2
Goodman Surgical Education Center, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The flipped classroom, a blended learning paradigm that uses pre-session online videos reinforced with interactive sessions, has been proposed as an alternative to traditional lectures. This article investigates medical students' perceptions of a simulation-based, flipped classroom for the surgery clerkship and suggests best practices for implementation in this setting.

METHODS:

A prospective cohort of students (n = 89), who were enrolled in the surgery clerkship during a 1-year period, was taught via a simulation-based, flipped classroom approach. Students completed an anonymous, end-of-clerkship survey regarding their perceptions of the curriculum. Quantitative analysis of Likert responses and qualitative analysis of narrative responses were performed.

RESULTS:

Students' perceptions of the curriculum were positive, with 90% rating it excellent or outstanding. The majority reported the curriculum should be continued (95%) and applied to other clerkships (84%). The component received most favorably by the students was the simulation-based skill sessions. Students rated the effectiveness of the Khan Academy-style videos the highest compared with other video formats (P < .001). Qualitative analysis identified 21 subthemes in 4 domains: general positive feedback, educational content, learning environment, and specific benefits to medical students. The students reported that the learning environment fostered accountability and self-directed learning. Specific perceived benefits included preparation for the clinical rotation and the National Board of Medical Examiners shelf exam, decreased class time, socialization with peers, and faculty interaction.

CONCLUSION:

Medical students' perceptions of a simulation-based, flipped classroom in the surgery clerkship were overwhelmingly positive. The flipped classroom approach can be applied successfully in a surgery clerkship setting and may offer additional benefits compared with traditional lecture-based curricula.

PMID:
27262534
DOI:
10.1016/j.surg.2016.03.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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