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Res Dev Disabil. 2016 Sep;56:83-98. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2016.04.009. Epub 2016 Jun 2.

Measuring intellectual ability in cerebral palsy: The comparison of three tests and their neuroimaging correlates.

Author information

1
Departament de Psicologia Clínica i Psicobiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Institut de Neurociències, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
2
Grup de Recerca en Neurologia Pediàtrica, Vall d'Hebron Institut de Recerca, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Servei de Neurologia, Hospital Universitari Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Servei de Rehabilitació i Medicina Física, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Servei de Radiologia Pediàtrica, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
6
Departamento de Fundamentos y Métodos de la Psicología, Facultad de Psicología y Educación, Universidad de Deusto, Bilbo-Bizkaia, Spain.
7
Departament de Psicologia Clínica i Psicobiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
8
Servei de Neonatologia, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
9
Departament de Psicologia Clínica i Psicobiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Institut de Neurociències, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: rpueyo@ub.edu.

Abstract

Standard intelligence scales require both verbal and manipulative responses, making it difficult to use in cerebral palsy and leading to underestimate their actual performance. This study aims to compare three intelligence tests suitable for the heterogeneity of cerebral palsy in order to identify which one(s) could be more appropriate to use. Forty-four subjects with bilateral dyskinetic cerebral palsy (26 male, mean age 23 years) conducted the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM), the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-3rd (PPVT-III) and the Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability (WNV). Furthermore, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed. The results show that PPVT-III gives limited information on cognitive performance and brain correlates, getting lower intelligence quotient scores. The WNV provides similar outcomes as RCPM, but cases with severe motor impairment were unable to perform it. Finally, the RCPM gives more comprehensive information on cognitive performance, comprising not only visual but also verbal functions. It is also sensitive to the structural state of the brain, being related to basal ganglia, thalamus and white matter areas such as superior longitudinal fasciculus. So, the RCPM may be considered a standardized easy-to-administer tool with great potential in both clinical and research fields of bilateral cerebral palsy.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral palsy; Intelligence tests; Neuroimaging; Neuropsychology; Raven's coloured progressive matrices; Voxel-based morphometry

PMID:
27262445
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2016.04.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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