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Complement Ther Med. 2016 Jun;26:92-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.03.009. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Effects of Buddhist walking meditation on glycemic control and vascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Faculty of Sports Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.
2
Theptarin Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.
3
Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
4
Faculty of Sports Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. Electronic address: daroonwanc@hotmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate and compare the effects of Buddhist walking meditation and traditional walking on glycemic control and vascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

METHODS:

Twenty three patients with type 2 diabetes (50-75 years) were randomly allocated into traditional walking exercise (WE; n=11) or Buddhism-based walking meditation exercise (WM; n=12). Both groups performed a 12-week exercise program that consisted of walking on the treadmill at exercise intensity of 50-70% maximum heart rate for 30min/session, 3 times/week. In the WM training program, the participants performed walking on the treadmill while concentrated on foot stepping by voiced "Budd" and "Dha" with each foot step that contacted the floor to practice mindfulness while walking.

RESULTS:

After 12 weeks, maximal oxygen consumption increased and fasting blood glucose level decreased significantly in both groups (p<0.05). Significant decrease in HbA1c and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed only in the WM group. Flow-mediated dilatation increased significantly (p<0.05) in both exercise groups but arterial stiffness was improved only in the WM group. Blood cortisol level was reduced (p<0.05) only in the WM group.

CONCLUSION:

Buddhist walking meditation exercise produced a multitude of favorable effects, often superior to traditional walking program, in patients with type 2 diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Alternative and complementary medicine; Arterial stiffness; Flow-mediated dilatation; Spirituality; Stress

PMID:
27261988
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2016.03.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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