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Cornea. 2016 Aug;35(8):1104-11. doi: 10.1097/ICO.0000000000000885.

Diurnal Tracking of Blink and Relationship to Signs and Symptoms of Dry Eye.

Author information

1
*Ora, Inc., Andover, MA; †SDC, Inc., Tempe, AZ; and ‡Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess diurnal changes in the signs and symptoms of dry eyes and their relationship to diurnal interblink interval (IBI) in normal subjects and in subjects with dry eye.

METHODS:

Blink data were collected from 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM during 2 days of normal activity using an electrocardiogram monitoring device. All subjects recorded ocular discomfort (0-5 scale) and primary activity hourly each day in a diary. Inferior and central fluorescein staining was graded by slit lamp (0-4) at the start and end of each day. Blink activity was detected using an algorithm based on recognition of the waveform corresponding to the kinematic properties of the blink signal.

RESULTS:

Normal subjects (N = 12) reported negligible symptoms, and results did not show a diurnal change in group hourly IBI. Mean daily IBI for the group with dry eye (N = 15) (4.63 ± 1.63 s) was shorter than that for the normal group (5.28 ± 1.48 s) (P = 0.0483). Correlation of diurnal symptoms and mean hourly IBI was relatively weak (r = -0.248). A repeated-measures model found IBI to be significantly associated with the time of day (P = 0.0028). Inferior corneal staining showed a small but significant diurnal increase for both normal group and group with dry eyes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diurnal blink tracking reveals significant trending with symptoms. Diurnal change in IBI may be an appropriate surrogate for symptoms in the study of dry eye.

PMID:
27261939
DOI:
10.1097/ICO.0000000000000885
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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