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Carbohydr Polym. 2016 Sep 20;149:163-74. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.04.080. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

A thermo-responsive and photo-polymerizable chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogel for 3D printing applications.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80082, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80082, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Equine Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80163, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80082, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.vermonden@uu.nl.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to design a hydrogel system based on methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA) and a thermo-sensitive poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-mono/dilactate)-polyethylene glycol triblock copolymer (M15P10) as a suitable material for additive manufacturing of scaffolds. CSMA was synthesized by reaction of chondroitin sulfate with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) in dimethylsulfoxide at 50°C and its degree of methacrylation was tunable up to 48.5%, by changing reaction time and GMA feed. Unlike polymer solutions composed of CSMA alone (20% w/w), mixtures based on 2% w/w of CSMA and 18% of M15P10 showed strain-softening, thermo-sensitive and shear-thinning properties more pronounced than those found for polymer solutions based on M15P10 alone. Additionally, they displayed a yield stress of 19.2±7.0Pa. The 3D printing of this hydrogel resulted in the generation of constructs with tailorable porosity and good handling properties. Finally, embedded chondrogenic cells remained viable and proliferating over a culture period of 6days. The hydrogel described herein represents a promising biomaterial for cartilage 3D printing applications.

KEYWORDS:

Cartilage 3D printing; Methacrylated chondroitin sulfate; Photo-polymerization; Shear thinning; Thermo-sensitive hydrogel

PMID:
27261741
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.04.080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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