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Carbohydr Polym. 2016 Sep 20;149:140-50. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.04.088. Epub 2016 Apr 23.

New studies on basil (Ocimum bacilicum L.) seed gum: Part II-Emulsifying and foaming characterization.

Author information

1
Food Hydrocolloids Research Centre, Department of Food Science and Technology, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM), PO Box: 91775-1163, Mashhad, Iran.
2
Food Hydrocolloids Research Centre, Department of Food Science and Technology, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM), PO Box: 91775-1163, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address: s.razavi@um.ac.ir.

Abstract

BSG is composed of two major fractions with different molecular weight: PER-BSG (5980kgmol(-1)) and SUPER-BSG (1045kgmol(-1)). In the present work, the emulsifying and foaming properties of BSG and its fractions were investigated as a function of molecular weight, chain flexibility and physicochemical features (protein and acid uronic content). BSG prevented creaming of emulsion for 4 weeks. This high stabilization may be related to formation a solid-like structure and viscoelastic film of BSG around oil droplets which protected oil droplets against aggregation. The low molecular weight fraction (SUPER-BSG) created more stable emulsion than high molecular weight fraction (PER-BSG). The foam capacity and stability of albumin solution increased by adding BSG. The highest foam stability was observed at the highest gum concentration (0.3% w/v). Removing protein moieties of BSG led to emulsion and foam stabilization properties of BSG weakened, which presents the importance of protein in emulsifying and foaming properties of BSG.

KEYWORDS:

Fractionation; Molecular weight; Protein moiety; Rheology; Seed mucilage; Surface activity

PMID:
27261739
DOI:
10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.04.088
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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