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Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2016 Sep;30:58-61. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2016.05.024. Epub 2016 May 24.

Cognitive functioning in individuals with Parkinson's disease and traumatic brain injury: A longitudinal study.

Author information

1
VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego, CA 92161, USA; University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: dschiehser@ucsd.edu.
2
VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego, CA 92161, USA; University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
3
University of California, San Diego, Department of Neurosciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
4
VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego, CA 92161, USA; University of California, San Diego, Department of Neurosciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine longitudinal changes in cognition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) with and without a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHODS:

Twenty-five PD participants with a history of mild-moderate post-acute (>9 months) TBI and 25 demographically-matched PD controls without a history of TBI were administered measures of cognition (Mattis Dementia Rating Scale), mood, and motor functioning at baseline and at a two-year follow-up evaluation.

RESULTS:

Individuals with PD and a history of TBI evidenced significantly greater decrements in overall cognition over the two year follow-up period compared to those without a history of TBI. Secondary subscale analyses suggest cognitive decrements may be mainly in the area of executive function, while a trend for group differences on the memory subscale was also observed. Groups did not differ on demographic, motor function, disease severity, cognitive, and mood profiles at baseline and evidenced comparable changes in mood and motor symptoms from baseline to follow-up.

CONCLUSION:

Findings suggest that a history of mild-moderate TBI is a risk factor for cognitive decline in individuals with PD.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Longitudinal; Neuropsychology; Parkinson’s disease; Traumatic brain injury

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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