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Oral Dis. 2017 Jul;23(5):551-558. doi: 10.1111/odi.12516. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

Unresolved questions regarding human hereditary deafness.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
Otolaryngology Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

Human hearing loss is a common neurosensory disorder about which many basic research and clinically relevant questions are unresolved. This review on hereditary deafness focuses on three examples considered at first glance to be uncomplicated, however, upon inspection, are enigmatic and ripe for future research efforts. The three examples of clinical and genetic complexities are drawn from studies of (i) Pendred syndrome/DFNB4 (PDS, OMIM 274600), (ii) Perrault syndrome (deafness and infertility) due to mutations of CLPP (PRTLS3, OMIM 614129), and (iii) the unexplained extensive clinical variability associated with TBC1D24 mutations. At present, it is unknown how different mutations of TBC1D24 cause non-syndromic deafness (DFNB86, OMIM 614617), epilepsy (OMIM 605021), epilepsy with deafness, or DOORS syndrome (OMIM 220500) that is characterized by deafness, onychodystrophy (alteration of toenail or fingernail morphology), osteodystrophy (defective development of bone), mental retardation, and seizures. A comprehensive understanding of the multifaceted roles of each gene associated with human deafness is expected to provide future opportunities for restoration as well as preservation of normal hearing.

KEYWORDS:

CLPP ; SLC26A4 ; TBC1D24 ; Pendred syndrome; Perrault syndrome; enlarged vestibular aqueduct; hereditary deafness

PMID:
27259978
PMCID:
PMC5136515
DOI:
10.1111/odi.12516
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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