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Methods Mol Biol. 2016;1427:59-72. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-3615-1_4.

Generation of Noninvasive, Quantifiable, Orthotopic Animal Models for NF2-Associated Schwannoma and Meningioma.

Burns SS1, Chang LS2,3,4,5,6.

Author information

1
Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, WA-5104, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA.
2
Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, WA-5104, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA. lchang@chi.osu.edu.
3
Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, 43205, USA. lchang@chi.osu.edu.
4
Department of Otolaryngology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. lchang@chi.osu.edu.
5
Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. lchang@chi.osu.edu.
6
Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA. lchang@chi.osu.edu.

Abstract

Schwannomas and meningiomas are nervous system tumors that can occur sporadically or in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Mutations of the Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene are frequently observed in these tumors. Schwannomas and meningiomas cause significant morbidities, and an FDA-approved medical therapy is currently not available. The development of preclinical animal models that accurately capture the clinical characteristics of these tumors will facilitate the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of these tumors, ultimately leading to more productive clinical trials. Here, we describe the generation of luciferase-expressing NF2-deficient schwannoma and meningioma cells and the use of these cells to establish orthotopic tumor models in immunodeficient mice. The growth of these tumors and their response to treatment can be measured effectively by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and confirmed by small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These and other animal models, such as genetically-engineered models, should substantially advance the investigation of promising therapies for schwannomas and meningiomas.

KEYWORDS:

Allograft; Bioluminescence imaging (BLI); Intranerve; Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Meningioma; Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene; Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2); Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice; Stereotactic; Vestibular schwannoma; Xenograft

PMID:
27259921
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-3615-1_4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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