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PLoS One. 2016 Jun 3;11(6):e0156070. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0156070. eCollection 2016.

Red Blood Cells from Individuals with Abdominal Obesity or Metabolic Abnormalities Exhibit Less Deformability upon Entering a Constriction.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, California, 95616, United States of America.
2
Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, Davis, California, 95616, United States of America.
3
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California Davis, Davis, California, 95616, United States of America.

Abstract

Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are multifactorial conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Previous work has demonstrated that the hemorheological profile is altered in patients with abdominal obesity and MS, as evidenced for example by increased whole blood viscosity. To date, however, no studies have examined red blood cell (RBC) deformability of blood from individuals with obesity or metabolic abnormalities under typical physiological flow conditions. In this study, we pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the mechanical behavior of ~8,000 RBCs obtained from either healthy individuals (n = 5) or obese participants with metabolic abnormalities (OMA) (n = 4). We demonstrate that the OMA+ cells stretched on average about 25% less than the healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the effects of ingesting a high-fat meal on RBC mechanical dynamics, and found that the postprandial period has only a weak effect on the stretching dynamics exhibited by OMA+ cells. The results suggest that chronic rigidification of RBCs plays a key role in the increased blood pressure and increased whole blood viscosity observed in OMA individuals and was independent of an acute response triggered by consumption of a high-fat meal.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01803633.

PMID:
27258098
PMCID:
PMC4892523
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0156070
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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