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Science. 2016 Jun 3;352(6290):1228-31. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf3161. Epub 2016 Jun 2.

Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs.

Author information

1
The Palaeogenomics and Bio-Archaeology Research Network, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. laurent.frantz@arch.ox.ac.uk greger.larson@arch.ox.ac.uk dbradley@tcd.ie.
2
Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
3
CNRS/ENS de Lyon, IGFL, UMR 5242 and French National Platform of Paleogenetics, PALGENE, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07, France/Université Grenoble Alpes, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA), F-38000 Grenoble, France. CNRS/Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle/Sorbonne Universités, Archéozoologie, Archéobotanique: Sociétés, Pratiques et Environnement (UMR 7209), CP56, 55 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France.
4
The Palaeogenomics and Bio-Archaeology Research Network, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
CNRS/ENS de Lyon, IGFL, UMR 5242 and French National Platform of Paleogenetics, PALGENE, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07, France/Université Grenoble Alpes, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA), F-38000 Grenoble, France.
6
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
7
The Palaeogenomics and Bio-Archaeology Research Network, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4352, USA.
8
The Palaeogenomics and Bio-Archaeology Research Network, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
9
CNRS/Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle/Sorbonne Universités, Archéozoologie, Archéobotanique: Sociétés, Pratiques et Environnement (UMR 7209), CP56, 55 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France.
10
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.
11
Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
12
Archaeological Institute, Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
13
Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Universitetskaya Nab. 1, 199034 Saint-Petersburg, Russia.
14
The National Museum of Romanian History, 12 Calea Victoriei, 030026 Bucharest, Romania.
15
Institut de Génétique et Développement de Rennes, CNRS-UMR6290, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France.
16
Department of Archaeology, School of Geosciences, University of Aberdeen, St. Mary's, Elphinstone Road, AB24 3UF, UK. Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, University of Liverpool, 12-14 Abercromby Square, Liverpool L69 7WZ, UK.
17
Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. laurent.frantz@arch.ox.ac.uk greger.larson@arch.ox.ac.uk dbradley@tcd.ie.

Abstract

The geographic and temporal origins of dogs remain controversial. We generated genetic sequences from 59 ancient dogs and a complete (28x) genome of a late Neolithic dog (dated to ~4800 calendar years before the present) from Ireland. Our analyses revealed a deep split separating modern East Asian and Western Eurasian dogs. Surprisingly, the date of this divergence (~14,000 to 6400 years ago) occurs commensurate with, or several millennia after, the first appearance of dogs in Europe and East Asia. Additional analyses of ancient and modern mitochondrial DNA revealed a sharp discontinuity in haplotype frequencies in Europe. Combined, these results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations. East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs.

PMID:
27257259
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf3161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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