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Nat Plants. 2016 May 27;2(6):16074. doi: 10.1038/nplants.2016.74.

Insight into the evolution of the Solanaceae from the parental genomes of Petunia hybrida.

Author information

1
Department of Horticulture, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 490 West Campus Dr., Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA.
2
Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Bern, Altenbergrain 21, 3013 Bern, Switzerland.
3
Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, P. R. China.
4
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland, 6 Rte Albert Gockel, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.
5
Department of Horticulture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA.
6
Department of Plant Development and (Epi)Genetics, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Plant Physiology, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
8
Institute of Plant and Microbiology, University of Zürich, Zollikerstr. 107, CH-8008 Zürich, Switzerland.
9
Interfaculty Bioinformatics Unit, University of Bern, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.
10
Cologne Biocenter, Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), University of Cologne, Zuelpicher Straße 47b, 50674 Cologne, Germany.
11
Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e l'analisi dell'economia agraria, Centro di Ricerca per l'Orticoltura (CREA-ORT), via Cavalleggeri 25, 84098 Pontecagnano (Sa) Italy.
12
Department of Breeding and Genomics, Plant and Food Research, Auckland, 120 Mt Albert Road, Mount Albert, Sandringham 1142, New Zealand.
13
Department of Plant Propagation, Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops (IGZ), Kühnhäuserstr. 101, 99090 Erfurt, Germany.
14
Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2063, USA.
15
Instituto de Biotecnología Vegetal, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, 30202, Cartagena, Spain.
16
Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Universita degli Studi di Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona, Italy.
17
Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, 533 Tower Rd, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.
18
Biosystematics Group, Wageningen University and Research Center, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, 6708 PB, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
19
Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.
20
Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA.
21
Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzhen 518083, China.
22
School of Plant Sciences, iPlant Collaborative, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA.
23
School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.
24
Laboratoire Reproduction et Développement des Plantes (RDP), ENS de Lyon/CNRS/INRA/UCBL, 46 Allée d'Italie, 69364 Lyon, France.
25
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland, 4 Rte Albert Gockel, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.
26
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland, 3 Rte Albert Gockel, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.
27
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland, 5 Rte Albert Gockel, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.
28
Institute for Epidemiology and Pathogen Diagnostics, Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Messeweg 11-12, 38104 Braunschweig, Germany.
29
Department of Crop and Plant Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire, UL LE12 5RD, UK.
30
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA.
31
Radboud University, FNWI, IWWR, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Petunia hybrida is a popular bedding plant that has a long history as a genetic model system. We report the whole-genome sequencing and assembly of inbred derivatives of its two wild parents, P. axillaris N and P. inflata S6. The assemblies include 91.3% and 90.2% coverage of their diploid genomes (1.4 Gb; 2n = 14) containing 32,928 and 36,697 protein-coding genes, respectively. The genomes reveal that the Petunia lineage has experienced at least two rounds of hexaploidization: the older gamma event, which is shared with most Eudicots, and a more recent Solanaceae event that is shared with tomato and other solanaceous species. Transcription factors involved in the shift from bee to moth pollination reside in particularly dynamic regions of the genome, which may have been key to the remarkable diversity of floral colour patterns and pollination systems. The high-quality genome sequences will enhance the value of Petunia as a model system for research on unique biological phenomena such as small RNAs, symbiosis, self-incompatibility and circadian rhythms.

Comment in

PMID:
27255838
DOI:
10.1038/nplants.2016.74
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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