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Angiology. 2017 May;68(5):447-461. doi: 10.1177/0003319716652031. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
1 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China.
2
2 Department of Clinical Medicine, The College of Clinical Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China.
3
3 Department of Nephrology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China.

Abstract

We evaluated the differences in major markers of cardiovascular (CV) risk between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and controls by a systematic review and a meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases for literature comparing CV risk markers in IBDs and controls. The overall mean carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD%), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) difference between patients with IBDs and control groups were calculated. Twenty-eight studies were included in the meta-analysis, including 16 studies with data on CIMT, 7 studies reporting FMD%, and 9 studies on cfPWV. Compared to controls, patients with IBDs showed significantly higher CIMT (standardized mean difference [ SMD]: 0.534 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.230 to 0.838; P = .001), significantly lower FMD% ( SMD, -0.721%; 95% CI, -1.020 to -0.421; P < .0001), and significantly increased cfPWV ( SMD, 0.849; 95% CI, 0.589 to 1.110; P < .0001). When analyzing subgroups with ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease (CD), all results were still significant except CIMT in CD. Our findings support the current evidence for an elevated CV burden in patients with IBD and support the clinical utility of markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in the management of these patients.

KEYWORDS:

atherosclerosis; cardiovascular disease; inflammatory bowel diseases

PMID:
27252243
DOI:
10.1177/0003319716652031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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