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Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jun;103(6):1434-42. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.130542.

Consumption of a cranberry juice beverage lowered the number of clinical urinary tract infection episodes in women with a recent history of urinary tract infection.

Author information

1
Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL; MB Clinical Research, Glen Ellyn, IL; kmaki@mbclinicalresearch.com.
2
Ocean Spray Cranberries, Lakeville-Middleboro, MA;
3
Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL;
4
Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; and VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and are often treated with antibiotics. Concerns about multidrug-resistant uropathogens have pointed to the need for safe and effective UTI-prevention strategies such as cranberry consumption.

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed the effects of the consumption of a cranberry beverage on episodes of clinical UTIs.

DESIGN:

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial, women with a history of a recent UTI were assigned to consume one 240-mL serving of cranberry beverage/d (n = 185) or a placebo (n = 188) beverage for 24 wk. The primary outcome was the clinical UTI incidence density, which was defined as the total number of clinical UTI events (including multiple events per subject when applicable) per unit of observation time.

RESULTS:

The dates of the random assignment of the first subject and the last subject's final visit were February 2013 and March 2015, respectively. The mean age was 40.9 y, and characteristics were similar in both groups. Compliance with study product consumption was 98%, and 86% of subjects completed the treatment period in both groups. There were 39 investigator-diagnosed episodes of clinical UTI in the cranberry group compared with 67 episodes in the placebo group (antibiotic use-adjusted incidence rate ratio: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.91; P = 0.016). Clinical UTI with pyuria was also significantly reduced (incidence rate ratio: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.97; P = 0.037). One clinical UTI event was prevented for every 3.2 woman-years (95% CI: 2.0, 13.1 woman-years) of the cranberry intervention. The time to UTI with culture positivity did not differ significantly between groups (HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.56, 1.67; P = 0.914).

CONCLUSION:

The consumption of a cranberry juice beverage lowered the number of clinical UTI episodes in women with a recent history of UTI. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01776021.

KEYWORDS:

antibiotics; bacteria; cranberry; inflammation; proanthocyanidin; urinary tract infection; women

PMID:
27251185
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.130542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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