Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurochem. 2016 Sep;138(5):653-93. doi: 10.1111/jnc.13667.

Targeting innate immunity for neurodegenerative disorders of the central nervous system.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford Neuroscience Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
2
Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, and Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.
3
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
4
Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore.
5
Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
6
Department of Neurosciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
7
Alzheimer Research Laboratory, Department of Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
8
USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, Tampa, FL, USA.
9
College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tampa, FL, USA.
10
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
11
The Shraga Segal Dept. of Microbiology, Immunology and Genetics, The Faculty of Health Sciences, The National Institute of Biotechnology in the Negev and Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
12
Departments of Neuroscience and Neurology, Del Monte Neuromedicine Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA.
13
Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
14
Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
15
Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.
16
The Dead Sea and Arava Science Center, Central Arava Branch, Yair Station, Hazeva, Israel.
17
Department of Clinical and Translational Physiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto, Japan.
18
Centre for Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK.
19
Departments of Physiology and Biophysics, Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Erratum in

Abstract

Neuroinflammation is critically involved in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, and key signaling steps of innate immune activation hence represent promising therapeutic targets. This mini review series originated from the 4th Venusberg Meeting on Neuroinflammation held in Bonn, Germany, 7-9th May 2015, presenting updates on innate immunity in acute brain injury and chronic neurodegenerative disorders, such as traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer disease, on the role of astrocytes and microglia, as well as technical developments that may help elucidate neuroinflammatory mechanisms and establish clinical relevance. In this meeting report, a brief overview of physiological and pathological microglia morphology is followed by a synopsis on PGE2 receptors, insights into the role of arginine metabolism and further relevant aspects of neuroinflammation in various clinical settings, and concluded by a presentation of technical challenges and solutions when working with microglia and astrocyte cultures. Microglial ontogeny and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived microglia, advances of TREM2 signaling, and the cytokine paradox in Alzheimer's disease are further contributions to this article. Neuroinflammation is critically involved in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, and key signaling steps of innate immune activation hence represent promising therapeutic targets. This mini review series originated from the 4th Venusberg Meeting on Neuroinflammation held in Bonn, Germany, 7-9th May 2015, presenting updates on innate immunity in acute brain injury and chronic neurodegenerative disorders, such as traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease, on the role of astrocytes and microglia, as well as technical developments that may help elucidate neuroinflammatory mechanisms and establish clinical relevance. In this meeting report, a brief overview on physiological and pathological microglia morphology is followed by a synopsis on PGE2 receptors, insights into the role of arginine metabolism and further relevant aspects of neuroinflammation in various clinical settings, and concluded by a presentation of technical challenges and solutions when working with microglia cultures. Microglial ontogeny and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived microglia, advances of TREM2 signaling, and the cytokine paradox in Alzheimer's disease are further contributions to this article.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer disease; Venusberg Neuroinflammation Meeting Bonn 2015; blood-brain barrier; innate immunity; macrophage; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

PMID:
27248001
PMCID:
PMC5433264
DOI:
10.1111/jnc.13667
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center