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Nat Rev Clin Oncol. 2016 Oct;13(10):627-42. doi: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2016.79. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

Clinical development of new drug-radiotherapy combinations.

Author information

1
UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, 72 Huntley Street, London WC1E 6DD, UK.
2
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
3
Cancer Research UK, London, UK.
4
University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
Eisai, Hatfield Business Park, UK.
6
Pfizer Ltd., Surrey, UK.
7
Kinapse Ltd, London, UK.
8
Cardiff University and Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, UK.
9
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
10
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
11
University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
12
National Cancer Research Institute, UK.
13
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
14
AstraZeneca, Cheshire, UK.
15
MISSION Therapeutics Ltd, Cambridge, UK.
16
Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany.
17
Astex Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, UK.
18
Vertex Pharmaceuticals (Europe) Ltd, Abingdon, UK.
19
BTG International Ltd, London, UK.
20
The Institute of Cancer Research/The Royal Marsden NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
21
Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
22
University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
23
Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
24
J&J Innovation, Menlo Park, California, USA.
25
Genentech Inc, South San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

In countries with the best cancer outcomes, approximately 60% of patients receive radiotherapy as part of their treatment, which is one of the most cost-effective cancer treatments. Notably, around 40% of cancer cures include the use of radiotherapy, either as a single modality or combined with other treatments. Radiotherapy can provide enormous benefit to patients with cancer. In the past decade, significant technical advances, such as image-guided radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton therapy enable higher doses of radiotherapy to be delivered to the tumour with significantly lower doses to normal surrounding tissues. However, apart from the combination of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy with radiotherapy, little progress has been made in identifying and defining optimal targeted therapy and radiotherapy combinations to improve the efficacy of cancer treatment. The National Cancer Research Institute Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) formed a Joint Working Group with representatives from academia, industry, patient groups and regulatory bodies to address this lack of progress and to publish recommendations for future clinical research. Herein, we highlight the Working Group's consensus recommendations to increase the number of novel drugs being successfully registered in combination with radiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with cancer.

PMID:
27245279
DOI:
10.1038/nrclinonc.2016.79
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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