Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Elife. 2016 May 31;5. pii: e14315. doi: 10.7554/eLife.14315.

Cell type specificity of neurovascular coupling in cerebral cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
2
Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
3
Department of Physics, John Carroll University, University Heights, United States.
4
Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, United States.
5
Department of Mathematical Sciences and Technology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
6
Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
7
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
8
Biology Undergraduate Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
9
Neurosciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
10
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
11
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
12
Department of Medical Genetics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
13
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
14
Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
15
Section of Neurobiology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, United States.
16
Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

Identification of the cellular players and molecular messengers that communicate neuronal activity to the vasculature driving cerebral hemodynamics is important for (1) the basic understanding of cerebrovascular regulation and (2) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals. Using a combination of optogenetic stimulation and 2-photon imaging in mice, we demonstrate that selective activation of cortical excitation and inhibition elicits distinct vascular responses and identify the vasoconstrictive mechanism as Neuropeptide Y (NPY) acting on Y1 receptors. The latter implies that task-related negative Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) fMRI signals in the cerebral cortex under normal physiological conditions may be mainly driven by the NPY-positive inhibitory neurons. Further, the NPY-Y1 pathway may offer a potential therapeutic target in cerebrovascular disease.

KEYWORDS:

2-photon microscopy; NPY; constriction; dilation; mouse; neuroscience; optogenetic

PMID:
27244241
PMCID:
PMC4933561
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.14315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center