Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Front Psychiatry. 2016 May 10;7:81. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2016.00081. eCollection 2016.

The Impact of a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Event-Related Potentials in Patients with Tic Disorders or Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.

Author information

  • 1Laboratoire de psychophysiologie cognitive et sociale, Montreal, QC, Canada; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Département de neurosciences, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
  • 2Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Département de psychiatrie, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
  • 3Laboratoire de psychophysiologie cognitive et sociale, Montreal, QC, Canada; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
  • 4Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Département de psychologie, Faculté des sciences humaines, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
  • 5Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Département de stomatologie, Faculté de médecine dentaire, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.
  • 6Laboratoire de psychophysiologie cognitive et sociale, Montreal, QC, Canada; Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Département de psychiatrie, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Tic disorders (TD) are characterized by the presence of non-voluntary contractions of functionally related groups of skeletal muscles in one or multiple body parts. Patients with body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRB) present frequent and repetitive behaviors, such as nail biting or hair pulling. TD and BFRB can be treated with a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) that regulates the excessive amount of sensorimotor activation and muscular tension. Our CBT, which is called the cognitive-psychophysiological (CoPs) model, targets motor execution and inhibition, and it was reported to modify brain activity in TD. However, psychophysiological effects of therapy are still poorly understood in TD and BFRB patients. Our goals were to compare the event-related potentials (ERP) of TD and BFRB patients to control participants and to investigate the effects of the CoPs therapy on the P200, N200, and P300 components during a motor and a non-motor oddball task.

METHOD:

Event-related potential components were compared in 26 TD patients, 27 BFRB patients, and 27 control participants. ERP were obtained from 63 EEG electrodes during two oddball tasks. In the non-motor task, participants had to count rare stimuli. In the motor task, participants had to respond with a left and right button press for rare and frequent stimuli, respectively. ERP measures were recorded before and after therapy in both patient groups.

RESULTS:

CoPs therapy improved symptoms similarly in both clinical groups. Before therapy, TD and BFRB patients had reduced P300 oddball effect during the non-motor task, in comparison with controls participants. An increase in the P300 oddball effect was observed posttherapy. This increase was distributed over the whole cortex in BFRB patients, but localized in the parietal area in TD patients.

DISCUSSION:

These results suggest a modification of neural processes following CoPs therapy in TD and BFRB patients. CoPs therapy seems to impact patients' attentional processes and context updating capacities in working memory (i.e., P300 component). Our results are consistent with a possible role of the prefrontal cortex and corpus callosum in mediating interhemispheric interference in TD.

KEYWORDS:

Tourette syndrome; body-focused repetitive behaviors; cognitive–behavioral therapy; cognitive–psychophysiological therapy; electrophysiology; event-related potentials; habit disorder; tic disorders

PMID:
27242551
PMCID:
PMC4861894
DOI:
10.3389/fpsyt.2016.00081
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center