Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Prev Med. 2016 Nov;51(5):762-766. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.04.015. Epub 2016 May 27.

Use of Electronic Cigarettes Among Cancer Survivors in the U.S.

Author information

1
Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, and Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida. Electronic address: rsalloum@ufl.edu.
2
Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, and Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.
3
Department of Social and Behavioral Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, Indiana.
5
Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, Oakland, California.
6
Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, and Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida; Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The population-level patterns of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among cancer survivors in the U.S. are unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of e-cigarette use among cancer survivors in a nationally representative sample.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey of the U.S. non-institutionalized civilian population. The main study outcomes were the prevalence and correlates of ever and current e-cigarette use among adults with self-reported history of cancer, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer (N=2,695). Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined whether e-cigarette use differed by cigarette smoking status and demographic subgroups. The analyses were performed in 2015.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of e-cigarette use among adult cancer survivors was lower than the general population: 2.8% of cancer survivors reported currently using e-cigarettes and an additional 6.3% had previously used e-cigarettes but were not currently using them. Use of e-cigarettes was most common among cancer survivors who currently smoked cigarettes: 34.3% of current smokers were ever e-cigarette users and 15.6% were current e-cigarette users, compared with former smokers (2.7% ever and 1.4% current e-cigarette users) and never smokers (small sample/estimates unavailable).

CONCLUSIONS:

E-cigarettes are not part of current evidence-based smoking-cessation strategies. However, the finding that cancer survivors who currently smoke cigarettes are more likely to use e-cigarettes highlights the importance of addressing e-cigarette use in patient-provider communications around tobacco cessation.

PMID:
27242079
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2016.04.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center