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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2016 Nov;97(11):1924-1930. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.04.021. Epub 2016 May 27.

Intermanual Transfer Effects in Below-Elbow Myoelectric Prosthesis Users.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
2
Italian Workers' Compensation Authority, Vigorso di Budrio, Bologna, Italy.
3
De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Center of Human Movement Sciences, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.k.van.der.sluis@umcg.nl.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine intermanual transfer effects in patients with a below-elbow amputation using a myoelectric prosthesis and to establish whether laterality affects these effects.

DESIGN:

Case-control.

SETTING:

A standardized setting in a rehabilitation clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

A convenience sample (N=44) of experienced myoelectric prosthesis users (n=22) and matched controls (n=22). Controls were matched on sex, age (±5y), and hand dominance.

INTERVENTIONS:

Both the experienced group and the control group performed several tasks using a prosthesis simulator attached to their nonaffected arm.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Movement time, force control, Box and Block test (BBT) scores, and duration of hand opening.

RESULTS:

Movement times of myoelectric prosthesis users were shorter, and these users had significantly higher BBT scores and shorter hand opening durations than those of controls. No intermanual transfer effects on force control and no laterality effects were found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intermanual transfer effects were present in experienced myoelectric prosthesis users with a below-elbow amputation, independent of laterality. These findings support the clinical relevance of intermanual transfer training, which may facilitate persons with an upper limb amputation to start training directly after the amputation.

KEYWORDS:

Amputation; Artificial limbs; Prostheses and implants; Rehabilitation; Transfer (psychology)

PMID:
27240431
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2016.04.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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