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Fertil Steril. 2016 Sep 1;106(3):723-30. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.05.015. Epub 2016 May 27.

Antimüllerian hormone in relation to tobacco and marijuana use and sources of indoor heating/cooking.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Electronic address: alexandra.white@nih.gov.
2
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
3
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina; Social and Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, North Carolina.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Preventative Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston, San Antonio Regional Campus, San Antonio, Texas; Southwest Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston, Houston, Texas.
6
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate exposure to tobacco, marijuana, and indoor heating/cooking sources in relation to antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis in a sample of premenopausal women (n = 913) enrolled in the Sister Study cohort (n = 50,884).

SETTING:

Not applicable.

PATIENT(S):

Women, ages 35-54 years at time of enrollment, with an archived serum sample and at least one intact ovary and classified as premenopausal.

INTERVENTION(S):

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Serum AMH (ng/mL) levels ascertained by ultrasensitive ELISA assay.

RESULT(S):

Lower AMH levels were associated with sources of indoor heating, including burning wood (-36.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -55.7%, -7.8%) or artificial fire logs (-45.8%; 95% CI, -67.2%, -10.4%) at least 10 times/year in a residential indoor stove/fireplace. Lower AMH levels were also observed in women who were current smokers of ≥20 cigarettes/day relative to nonsmokers (-56.2%; 95% CI, -80.3%, -2.8%) and in women with 10+ years of adult environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure (-31.3%; 95% CI, -51.3%, -3.1%), but no associations were observed for marijuana use.

CONCLUSION(S):

We confirmed previously reported findings of lower AMH levels in current heavy smokers and also found associations for long-term ETS exposure and indoor burning of wood or artificial fire logs. These findings suggest that combustion by-products from common exposures can have toxic effects on the human ovary.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-Müllerian Hormone; Tobacco; breast cancer; environmental tobacco smoke; indoor air pollution

PMID:
27240193
PMCID:
PMC5010988
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2016.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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