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Nat Neurosci. 2016 Jul;19(7):952-8. doi: 10.1038/nn.4310. Epub 2016 May 30.

Hippocampal global remapping for different sensory modalities in flying bats.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.
2
Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Research, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
3
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, Virginia, USA.

Abstract

Hippocampal place cells encode the animal's spatial position. However, it is unknown how different long-range sensory systems affect spatial representations. Here we alternated usage of vision and echolocation in Egyptian fruit bats while recording from single neurons in hippocampal areas CA1 and subiculum. Bats flew back and forth along a linear flight track, employing echolocation in darkness or vision in light. Hippocampal representations remapped between vision and echolocation via two kinds of remapping: subiculum neurons turned on or off, while CA1 neurons shifted their place fields. Interneurons also exhibited strong remapping. Finally, hippocampal place fields were sharper under vision than echolocation, matching the superior sensory resolution of vision over echolocation. Simulating several theoretical models of place-cells suggested that combining sensory information and path integration best explains the experimental sharpening data. In summary, here we show sensory-based global remapping in a mammal, suggesting that the hippocampus does not contain an abstract spatial map but rather a 'cognitive atlas', with multiple maps for different sensory modalities.

PMID:
27239936
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4310
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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