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Appetite. 2016 Oct 1;105:189-94. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.05.029. Epub 2016 May 26.

Increased textural complexity in food enhances satiation.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
2
School of Medical and Health Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
3
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Electronic address: b.james@auckland.ac.nz.

Abstract

For the first time this study has shown a direct effect of food textural complexity on satiation. Independent of oral processing time, increasing the textural complexity of a food significantly decreased food intake. Foods with complex textures stimulate many sensory perceptions during oral processing, with a succession of textures perceived between first bite and swallow. Previously the impact of texture on satiation (commonly tested by increasing viscosities of semi-solids) has been explained by texture's influence on oral processing time; a long oral processing time enhances satiation. The results of the current study show that subjects in a randomised cross-over trial who consumed a "starter" (preload) model food with high textural complexity went on to eat significantly less of a two course ad libitum meal. Subjects who consumed a "starter" model food with low textural complexity, but with the same flavour, energy density and oral processing time, ate significantly more of the same ad libitum meal. The results show that increasing the number of textures perceived during chewing of a solid food triggers the satiation response earlier than when chewing a less texturally complex food. Increasing textural complexity of manufactured foods, to allow for greater sensory stimulation per bite, could potentially be used as a tool to enhance the satiation response and decrease food intake.

KEYWORDS:

Chewing time; Food oral breakdown; Food structure; Food texture; Oral processing; Satiation; Textural complexity

PMID:
27235823
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2016.05.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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