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J Music Ther. 2016 Fall;53(3):279-307. doi: 10.1093/jmt/thw008. Epub 2016 May 27.

Training Endogenous Task Shifting Using Music Therapy: A Feasibility Study.

Author information

1
Colorado State University Colleen Lynch, MM, MT-BC, is a music therapist currently working in the psychosomatic clinic of Ostalb Klinikum Aalen, Germany. Blythe LaGasse, PhD, MT-BC, is an associate professor of music therapy at Colorado State University.
2
Colorado State University Colleen Lynch, MM, MT-BC, is a music therapist currently working in the psychosomatic clinic of Ostalb Klinikum Aalen, Germany. Blythe LaGasse, PhD, MT-BC, is an associate professor of music therapy at Colorado State University. blagasse@colostate.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

People with acquired brain injury (ABI) are highly susceptible to disturbances in executive functioning (EF), and these effects are pervasive. Research studies using music therapy for cognitive improvement in this population are limited.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a Musical Executive Function Training (MEFT) intervention to address task-shifting skills in adults with ABI and to obtain preliminary evidence of intervention effect on task shifting.

METHODS:

Fourteen participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a music therapy intervention group (MTG), a singing group (SG), or the no-intervention control group (CG). The SG and MTG met for one hour a day for five days. Feasibility measures included participant completion rates and intervention fidelity. Potential benefits were measured using the Trail Making Test and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task as a pre- and posttest measure.

RESULTS:

Participant completion rates and interventionist fidelity to the protocol supported feasibility. One-way ANOVA of the pre- and posttest group differences revealed a trend toward improvement in the MTG over the SG.

CONCLUSIONS:

Feasibility and effect size data support a larger trial of the MEFT protocol.

KEYWORDS:

acquired brain injury; endogenous attention; executive function; feasibility; intervention fidelity; music therapy; traumatic brain injury

PMID:
27235114
DOI:
10.1093/jmt/thw008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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