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Malar J. 2016 May 28;15(1):300. doi: 10.1186/s12936-016-1354-y.

Strengthening individual capacity in monitoring and evaluation of malaria control programmes to streamline M&E systems and enhance information use in malaria endemic countries.

Author information

1
MEASURE Evaluation, ICF International, 530 Gaither Road, Suite 500, Rockville, MD, 20850, USA. Ashley.Garley@icfi.com.
2
President's Malaria Initiative, US Agency for International Development, Washington DC, USA.
3
Centre de Recherche en Santé de Nouna, CRSN, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
4
School of Public Health, University of Legon, Accra, Ghana.
5
National Malaria Control Programme, Accra, Ghana.
6
Unité de formation et de recherche, Science de la Santé, Centre de recherche international pour la Santé, Université de Ouagadougou, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
7
MEASURE Evaluation, ICF International, 530 Gaither Road, Suite 500, Rockville, MD, 20850, USA.
8
United Nations Foundation, Washington DC, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Malaria control interventions in most endemic countries have intensified in recent years and so there is a need for a robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system to measure progress and achievements. Providing programme and M&E officers with the appropriate skills is a way to strengthen malaria's M&E systems and enhance information use for programmes' implementation. This paper describes a recent effort in capacity strengthening for malaria M&E in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

METHODS:

From 2010 to 2014, capacity-strengthening efforts consisted of organizing regional in-person workshops for M&E of malaria programmes for Anglophone and Francophone countries in SSA in collaboration with partners from Ghana and Burkina Faso. Open-sourced online courses were also available in English. A post-workshop assessment was conducted after 5 years to assess the effects of these regional workshops and identify gaps in capacity.

RESULTS:

The regional workshops trained 181 participants from 28 countries from 2010 to 2014. Trained participants were from ministries of health, national malaria control and elimination programmes, non-governmental organizations, and development partners. The average score (%) for participants' knowledge tests increased from pretest to posttest for Anglophone workshops (2011: 59 vs. 76, 2012: 41 vs. 63, 2013: 51 vs. 73; 2014: 50 vs. 74). Similarly, Francophone workshop posttest scores increased, but were lower than Anglophone due to higher scores at pretest. (2011: 70 vs. 76, 2012: 74 vs. 79, 2013: 61 vs. 68; 2014: 64 vs. 75). Results of the post-workshop assessment revealed that participants retained practical M&E knowledge and skills for malaria programs, but there is a need for a module on malaria surveillance adapted to the pre-elimination context.

CONCLUSION:

The workshops were successful because of the curriculum content, facilitation quality, and the engagement of partner institutions with training expertise. Results from the post-workshop assessment will guide the curriculum's development and restructuring for the next phase of workshops. Country-specific malaria M&E capacity needs assessments may also inform this process as countries reduce malaria burden.

KEYWORDS:

Burkina Faso; Capacity building; Ghana; Health information systems; Malaria; Monitoring and evaluation; Training

PMID:
27233243
PMCID:
PMC4884432
DOI:
10.1186/s12936-016-1354-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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