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PLoS One. 2016 May 25;11(5):e0155442. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0155442. eCollection 2016.

Looking to Learn: The Effects of Visual Guidance on Observational Learning of the Golf Swing.

Author information

1
Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Life Sciences, College of Health and Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, Middlesex, United Kingdom.
2
Department of Life Sciences, College of Health and Life Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, Middlesex, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Skilled performers exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than less-skilled counterparts do and they look more frequently at task-relevant regions than at superfluous ones. We examine whether we may guide novices' gaze towards relevant regions during action observation in order to facilitate their learning of a complex motor skill. In a Pre-test-Post-test examination of changes in their execution of the full golf swing, 21 novices viewed one of three videos at intervention: i) a skilled golfer performing 10 swings (Free Viewing, FV); ii) the same video with transient colour cues superimposed to highlight key features of the setup (Visual Guidance; VG); iii) or a History of Golf video (Control). Participants in the visual guidance group spent significantly more time looking at cued areas than did the other two groups, a phenomenon that persisted after the cues had been removed. Moreover, the visual guidance group improved their swing execution at Post-test and on a Retention test one week later. Our results suggest that visual guidance to cued areas during observational learning of complex motor skills may accelerate acquisition of the skill.

PMID:
27224057
PMCID:
PMC4880294
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0155442
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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