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Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2016;25(2):393-401. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.2016.25.2.28.

Fast foods--are they a risk factor for functional gastrointestinal disorders?

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Medical Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Medical Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Email: tcwu@vghtpe.gov.tw.
3
Department of Health Services, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAn.
4
Division of Epidemiology and Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

in English, Chinese

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Fast-food consumption has greatly increased in Taiwan. Frequent fast food intake is associated with both allergy and obesity. The aim of this study was to describe fast food habit changes, and to assess the relationship between fast food intake and the risk of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) among Taiwanese adolescents.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN:

This analysis used data from the Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT) of high school students conducted in 2011. A total of 2,042 adolescents (12-19 years) completed the questionnaire. The survey included the Rome III criteria for FGIDs, translated into Chinese for adolescents. Respondents with previously diagnosed chronic organic gastrointestinal diseases were excluded from the study.

RESULTS:

In total, 2,034 children were enrolled. 545 subjects (26.8%) had history of at least one FGID. 88.1% of the subjects reported fast foods consumption. A significantly higher prevalence of FGIDs was noted in adolescents with a history of fast foods consumption, compared with those reported not to have ingested fast foods in the past 30 days (27.6% vs 20.6%, p=0.024). An increased risk of FGIDs in children and adolescents was associated with fast food intake (OR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.78-1.83).

CONCLUSIONS:

FGIDs were common among Taiwanese adolescents. Fast-food consumption may contribute to a positive association with the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Lower fiber intake and more frozen desserts in the diet may be complicit in FGIDs. The findings have public health relevance in regard to the global increase in fast food consumption.

PMID:
27222424
DOI:
10.6133/apjcn.2016.25.2.28
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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