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Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:417-427. doi: 10.1016/j.wasman.2016.05.015. Epub 2016 May 20.

A new dawn for buried garbage? An investigation of the marketability of previously disposed shredder waste.

Author information

1
Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: Nils.johansson@liu.se.
2
Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.

Abstract

This paper examines the market potential of disposed shredder waste, a resource that is increasingly emphasized as a future mine. A framework with gate requirements of various outlets was developed and contrasted with a pilot project focusing on excavated waste from a shredder landfill, sorted in an advanced recycling facility. Only the smallest fraction by percentage had an outlet, the metals (8%), which were sold according to a lower quality class. The other fractions (92%) were not accepted for incineration, as construction materials or even for re-deposition. Previous studies have shown similar lack of marketability. This means that even if one fraction can be recovered, the outlet of the other material is often unpredictable, resulting in a waste disposal problem, which easily prevents a landfill mining project altogether. This calls for marketability and usability of deposited waste to become a central issue for landfill mining research. The paper concludes by discussing how concerned actors can enhance the marketability, for example by pre-treating the disposed waste to acclimatize it to existing sorting methods. However, for concerned actors to become interested in approaching unconventional resources such as deposited waste, greater regulatory flexibility is needed in which, for example, re-deposition could be allowed as long as the environmental benefits of the projects outweigh the disadvantages.

KEYWORDS:

Disposed waste; Landfill mining; Marketability; Policy; Technology

PMID:
27216727
DOI:
10.1016/j.wasman.2016.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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