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Cell. 2016 Jun 16;165(7):1658-1671. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.04.049. Epub 2016 May 19.

Corpse Engulfment Generates a Molecular Memory that Primes the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK.
2
Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease and the Bateson Centre, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK; Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK; School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK; Lee Kong Chiang School of Medicine, Nanyang Technologicial University, Singapore 636921, Singapore. Electronic address: paul.martin@bristol.ac.uk.
4
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK. Electronic address: w.wood@bristol.ac.uk.

Abstract

Macrophages are multifunctional cells that perform diverse roles in health and disease. Emerging evidence has suggested that these innate immune cells might also be capable of developing immunological memory, a trait previously associated with the adaptive system alone. While recent studies have focused on the dramatic macrophage reprogramming that follows infection and protects against secondary microbial attack, can macrophages also develop memory in response to other cues? Here, we show that apoptotic corpse engulfment by Drosophila macrophages is an essential primer for their inflammatory response to tissue damage and infection in vivo. Priming is triggered via calcium-induced JNK signaling, which leads to upregulation of the damage receptor Draper, thus providing a molecular memory that allows the cell to rapidly respond to subsequent injury or infection. This remarkable plasticity and capacity for memory places macrophages as key therapeutic targets for treatment of inflammatory disorders.

PMID:
27212238
PMCID:
PMC4912690
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.04.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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