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Anesthesiol Clin. 2016 Jun;34(2):255-69. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2016.01.001.

Imaging Pain.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Division of Pain Medicine, Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab (SNAPL), 1070 Arastradero Road, Suite 200, MC 5596, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1345, USA.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Division of Pain Medicine, Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab (SNAPL), 1070 Arastradero Road, Suite 200, MC 5596, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1345, USA. Electronic address: smackey@stanford.edu.

Abstract

The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI.

KEYWORDS:

Brain-based therapies; Chronic pain; MRI; MVPA; Neuroimaging; Resting-state networks

PMID:
27208709
PMCID:
PMC5289642
DOI:
10.1016/j.anclin.2016.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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