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Toxicol Sci. 2016 Jul;152(1):10-6. doi: 10.1093/toxsci/kfw059. Epub 2016 May 5.

The Emergence of Systematic Review in Toxicology.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Baltimore, Maryland msteph14@jhu.edu.
2
Freelance Science and Technology Writer, Takoma Park, Maryland.
3
American Chemistry Council, Washington, District of Columbia.
4
US Environmental Protection Agency, Arlington, Virginia.
5
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
6
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland.
7
ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, New Jersey.
8
George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, DC.
9
Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing, Baltimore, Maryland University of Konstanz, CAAT-Europe, Germany.
10
Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, District of Columbia.
11
Office of Health Assessment and Translation, Division of the National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.
12
European Food Safety Authority, Parma 43126, Italy.
13
seh consulting + services, Paderborn 33098, Germany.

Abstract

The Evidence-based Toxicology Collaboration hosted a workshop on "The Emergence of Systematic Review and Related Evidence-based Approaches in Toxicology," on November 21, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland. The workshop featured speakers from agencies and organizations applying systematic review approaches to questions in toxicology, speakers with experience in conducting systematic reviews in medicine and healthcare, and stakeholders in industry, government, academia, and non-governmental organizations. Based on the workshop presentations and discussion, here we address the state of systematic review methods in toxicology, historical antecedents in both medicine and toxicology, challenges to the translation of systematic review from medicine to toxicology, and thoughts on the way forward. We conclude with a recommendation that as various agencies and organizations adapt systematic review methods, they continue to work together to ensure that there is a harmonized process for how the basic elements of systematic review methods are applied in toxicology.

KEYWORDS:

data integration.; risk of bias; systematic review

PMID:
27208075
PMCID:
PMC4922539
DOI:
10.1093/toxsci/kfw059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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