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J Cell Sci. 2016 Jul 1;129(13):2493-9. doi: 10.1242/jcs.189910. Epub 2016 May 19.

Meiotic onset is reliant on spatial distribution but independent of germ cell number in the mouse ovary.

Author information

1
Department of Ob/Gyn and Reproductive Sciences, Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, San Francisco, 35 Medical Center Way, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
2
University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Laboratory of Development of the Gonads; CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, LDG; INSERM, Unit of Genetic Stability, Stem cells and Radiation, UMR-967; University Paris-Sud, Fontenay-aux-Roses F-92265, France.
3
Department of Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, 4422 Tupper Hall, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
4
Department of Ob/Gyn and Reproductive Sciences, Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, San Francisco, 35 Medical Center Way, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA diana.laird@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Mouse ovarian germ cells enter meiosis in a wave that propagates from anterior to posterior, but little is known about contribution of germ cells to initiation or propagation of meiosis. In a Ror2 mutant with diminished germ cell number and migration, we find that overall timing of meiotic initiation is delayed at the population level. We use chemotherapeutic depletion to exclude a profoundly reduced number of germ cells as a cause for meiotic delay. We rule out sex reversal or failure to specify somatic support cells as contributors to the meiotic phenotype. Instead, we find that anomalies in the distribution of germ cells as well as gonad shape in mutants contribute to aberrant initiation of meiosis. Our analysis supports a model of meiotic initiation via diffusible signal(s), excludes a role for germ cells in commencing the meiotic wave and furnishes the first phenotypic demonstration of the wave of meiotic entry. Finally, our studies underscore the importance of considering germ cell migration defects while studying meiosis to discern secondary effects resulting from positioning versus primary meiotic entry phenotypes.

KEYWORDS:

Germ cell; Gonad; Meiosis; Migration; Ror2; Wave

PMID:
27199373
PMCID:
PMC5930833
DOI:
10.1242/jcs.189910
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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