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Br J Psychiatry. 2016 Nov;209(5):427-428. Epub 2016 May 19.

Initial depression severity and response to antidepressants v. placebo: patient-level data analysis from 34 randomised controlled trials.

Author information

1
Jonathan Rabinowitz, PhD, Nomi Werbeloff, PhD, School of Social Work, Ramat Gan, Bar Ilan University, Israel; Francine S. Mandel, PhD, Pfizer Development Operations, New York, USA; François Menard, MD, Lundbec Research Department, Paris, France; Lauren Marangell, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA; Shitij Kapur, MD, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, London, UK Jonathan.Rabinowitz@biu.ac.il.
2
Jonathan Rabinowitz, PhD, Nomi Werbeloff, PhD, School of Social Work, Ramat Gan, Bar Ilan University, Israel; Francine S. Mandel, PhD, Pfizer Development Operations, New York, USA; François Menard, MD, Lundbec Research Department, Paris, France; Lauren Marangell, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA; Shitij Kapur, MD, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, London, UK.

Abstract

Several often-cited meta-analyses have reported that the efficacy of antidepressant medications depends on the severity of depression. They found that drug-placebo differences increased as a function of initial severity, which was attributed to decreased responsiveness to placebo among patients with severe depression rather than to increased responsiveness to medication. We retested this using patient-level data and also undertaking a meta-analysis of trial-level data from 34 randomised placebo controlled trials (n = 10 737) from the NEWMEDS registry. Although our trial-level data support prevous findings, patient-level data did not show any significant effect of initial depression severity on drug v. placebo difference.

PMID:
27198482
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.115.173906
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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