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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016 Aug;25(8):1201-7. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0149. Epub 2016 May 19.

Oral Hygiene and Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-A Population-Based Case-Control Study in China.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Exponent, Inc., Health Sciences Practice, Menlo Park, California. Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
3
Department of Cancer Prevention Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.
4
Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuzhou Red Cross Hospital, Wuzhou, Guangxi, China. Wuzhou Health System Key Laboratory for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Etiology and Molecular Mechanism, Wuzhou, Guangxi, China.
5
Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, China. Key Laboratory of High-Incidence-Tumor Prevention & Treatment (Guangxi Medical University), Ministry of Education, Nanning, Guangxi, China.
6
State Key Laboratory for Infectious Diseases Prevention and Control, Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
7
State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.
8
Cangwu Institute for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Control and Prevention, Wuzhou, Guangxi, China.
9
Key Laboratory of High-Incidence-Tumor Prevention & Treatment (Guangxi Medical University), Ministry of Education, Nanning, Guangxi, China.
10
Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
11
Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
12
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
13
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. weimin.ye@ki.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The association between oral health and risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is largely unknown. Further understanding could shed light on potential pathogenic mechanisms and preventive measures.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based case-control study in southern China between 2010 and 2014. We enrolled 2,528 incident NPC cases, aged 20-74 years, and 2,596 controls, randomly selected from the total population registers, with frequency matching to the 5-year age and sex distribution of the cases by geographic region. We interviewed subjects using a structured questionnaire inquiring about oral health indicators and potential confounding factors. We used unconditional logistic regression to estimate multivariate-adjusted ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

RESULTS:

A higher number of filled teeth was associated with an elevated risk of NPC. Individuals with 1 to 3 and more than 3 teeth filled versus none had adjusted ORs of 1.25 (95% CI, 1.06-1.49) and 1.55 (95% CI, 1.13-2.12), respectively (Ptrend = 0.002). Conversely, the adjusted OR for those who brushed teeth twice or more per day versus once or less per day was 0.62 (95% CI, 0.55-0.70). We detected a borderline significant positive association with earlier age at first adult tooth loss.

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggested a positive association between some indicators of poor oral health and risk of NPC. Further studies are needed to confirm whether the findings are causal and, if so, to further explain the underlying mechanisms.

IMPACT:

Improvement of oral hygiene might contribute to reducing NPC risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(8); 1201-7. ©2016 AACR.

PMID:
27197279
PMCID:
PMC4970945
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-16-0149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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