Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Public Health. 2016 Jul;106(7):1231-2. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2016.303201. Epub 2016 May 19.

Challenges in Identifying Refugees in National Health Data Sets.

Author information

1
Wagahta Semere and Emily A. Wang are with the Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Katherine Yun is with the Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Cyrus Ahalt and Brie Williams are with the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate publicly available data sets to determine their utility for studying refugee health.

METHODS:

We searched for keywords describing refugees in data sets within the Society of General Internal Medicine Dataset Compendium and the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research database. We included in our analysis US-based data sets with publicly available documentation and a self-defined, health-related focus that allowed for an examination of patient-level factors.

RESULTS:

Of the 68 data sets that met the study criteria, 37 (54%) registered keyword matches related to refugees, but only 2 uniquely identified refugees.

CONCLUSIONS:

Few health data sets identify refugee status among participants, presenting barriers to understanding refugees' health and health care needs.

PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS:

Information about refugee status in national health surveys should include expanded demographic questions and focus on mental health and chronic disease.

PMID:
27196649
PMCID:
PMC4984733
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2016.303201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center