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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016 Apr;25(4):573-80. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-1297.

Recommendations for Cancer Epidemiologic Research in Understudied Populations and Implications for Future Needs.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. martinda@mail.nih.gov.
2
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.
3
Center for Community Alliance for Research and Education, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, California.
4
Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland.
5
Native American Cancer Research Corporation, Denver, Colorado. Native American Cancer Initiatives, Incorporated, Colorado.
6
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.
8
Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California. Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California.
9
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
10
School of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
11
Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
12
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
13
College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri.
14
Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine/Burrell Institute for Health Policy & Research, Las Cruces, New Mexico.
15
Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.

Abstract

Medically underserved populations in the United States continue to experience higher cancer burdens of incidence, mortality, and other cancer-related outcomes. It is imperative to understand how health inequities experienced by diverse population groups may contribute to our increasing unequal cancer burdens and disparate outcomes. The National Cancer Institute convened a diverse group of scientists to discuss research challenges and opportunities for cancer epidemiology in medically underserved and understudied populations. This report summarizes salient issues and discusses five recommendations from the group, including the next steps required to better examine and address cancer burden in the United States among our rapidly increasing diverse and understudied populations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 573-80.

PMID:
27196089
PMCID:
PMC4874661
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-1297
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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