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Physiol Behav. 2016 Sep 1;163:211-218. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.05.025. Epub 2016 May 16.

Physical and psychological benefits of once-a-week Pilates exercises in young sedentary women: A 10-week longitudinal study.

Author information

1
Doctoral School of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Izabella u. 46, H-1064 Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address: tolnora@yahoo.com.
2
Institute of Health Promotion and Sport Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Bogdánfy Ö. u.10., H-1117 Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address: zsofiszabo.zs@gmail.com.
3
Institute of Health Promotion and Sport Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Bogdánfy Ö. u.10., H-1117 Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address: koteles.ferenc@ppk.elte.hu.
4
Institute of Health Promotion and Sport Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Bogdánfy Ö. u.10., H-1117 Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address: szabo.attila@ppk.elte.hu.

Abstract

Pilates exercises have several demonstrated physical and psychological benefits. To date, most research in this context was conducted with symptomatic or elderly people with few dependent measures. The current study examined the chronic or longitudinal effects of very low frequency, once a week, Pilates training on several physical and psychological measures, over a 10-week intervention, in young, healthy, and sedentary women. Further, the study gauged the acute effects of Pilates exercises on positive- and negative affect in 10 exercise sessions. Compared to a control group, the Pilates group exhibited significant improvements in skeletal muscle mass, flexibility, balance, core- and abdominal muscle strength, body awareness, and negative affect. This group also showed favorable changes in positive (22.5% increase) and negative affect (12.2% decrease) in nine out of ten exercise sessions. This work clearly demonstrates the acute and chronic benefits of Pilates training on both physical and psychological measures. It also reveals that even only once a week Pilates training is enough to trigger detectable benefits in young sedentary women. While this frequency is below the required levels of exercise for health, it may overcome the 'lack of time' excuse for not exercising and subsequently its tangible benefits may positively influence one's engagement in more physical activity.

KEYWORDS:

Anthropometry; Body composition; Health; Performance; Training

PMID:
27195456
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.05.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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