Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Immunity. 2016 May 17;44(5):1069-78. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2016.04.023.

Targeting T Cell Co-receptors for Cancer Therapy.

Author information

1
Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: callaham@mskcc.org.
2
Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
3
Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA; Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Abstract

Checkpoint-blocking antibodies can generate potent anti-tumor responses by encouraging the immune system to seek and destroy cancer cells. At this time, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved three checkpoint-blocking antibodies in three disease indications, and additional approvals are expected to broaden the clinical scope of immunotherapy. Herein, we review the clinical development of CTLA-4-, PD-1-, and PD-L1-blocking antibodies across tumor types and briefly discuss areas of active investigation of potential biomarkers.

PMID:
27192570
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2016.04.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center