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Int J Eat Disord. 2016 Aug;49(8):817-21. doi: 10.1002/eat.22537. Epub 2016 May 18.

Self-weighing behavior in individuals with eating disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
2
Department of Epidemiology & Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
3
Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Fargo, North Dakota.
4
University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota.
5
The Emily Program, St. Paul, Minnesota.
6
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.
7
VA South Central Mental Illness Research, Education & Clinical Center; VA HSR&D Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness & Safety (IQuEST), Dept. of Psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States.
8
Department of Psychiatry, The University of California, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the frequency of self-weighing and reactions to prescribed weekly weighing among individuals with eating disorder (ED) diagnoses, and to compare individuals weighing more or less frequently on mass index (BMI) and the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) subscales.

METHOD:

Baseline EDE and demographics from five studies (N = 758).

RESULTS:

Self-weighing was most frequent among individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN), followed by those with bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED). On average, participants reacted moderately negative to prescribed weekly weighing. No relationship between weighing frequency and BMI was evident in any sample. There was indication of greater pathology (i.e., restraint, shape concern, weight concern, global) in AN with more frequent weighing. In BN, mixed evidence emerged to support a relationship between more frequent weighing and higher shape concern, weight concern, and global score. In BED, higher restraint was found in those who weighed versus those who did not.

DISCUSSION:

Weighing frequency in each eating disorder (ED) sample was to some extent associated with greater ED severity, but not BMI. Future research should examine relationships between self-weighing, reactions to changing weighing frequency, and ED symptomatology in both ED and non-ED groups to understand the impact of self-weighing in heterogeneous populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:817-821).

KEYWORDS:

anorexia nervosa; binge eating disorder; bulimia nervosa; self-weighing; weighing

PMID:
27188448
PMCID:
PMC5604338
DOI:
10.1002/eat.22537
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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