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Int J Shoulder Surg. 2016 Apr-Jun;10(2):78-84. doi: 10.4103/0973-6042.180720.

Rotator cuff tears after total shoulder arthroplasty in primary osteoarthritis: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA, USA.
3
Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

Rotator cuff tears have been reported to be uncommon following total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Postoperative rotator cuff tears can lead to pain, proximal humeral migration, and glenoid component loosening. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the incidence of post-TSA rotator cuff tears or dysfunction in osteoarthritic patients. A systematic review of multiple databases was performed using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Levels I-IV evidence clinical studies of patients with primary osteoarthritis with a minimum 2-year follow-up were included. Fifteen studies with 1259 patients (1338 shoulders) were selected. Student's t-tests were used with a significant alpha value of 0.05. All patients demonstrated significant improvements in motion and validated clinical outcome scores (P < 0.001). Radiographic humeral head migration was the most commonly reported data point for extrapolation of rotator cuff integrity. After 6.6 ± 3.1 years, 29.9 ± 20.7% of shoulders demonstrated superior humeral head migration and 17.9 ± 14.3% migrated a distance more than 25% of the head. This was associated with an 11.3 ± 7.9% incidence of postoperative superior cuff tears. The incidence of radiographic anterior humeral head migration was 11.9 ± 15.9%, corresponding to a 3.0 ± 13.6% rate of subscapularis tears. We found an overall 1.2 ± 4.5% rate of reoperation for cuff injury. Nearly all studies reported indirect markers of rotator cuff dysfunction, such as radiographic humeral head migration and clinical exam findings. This systematic review suggests that rotator cuff dysfunction following TSA may be more common than previously reported. IV, systematic review of Levels I-IV studies.

KEYWORDS:

Glenohumeral; humeral head migration; osteoarthritis; rotator cuff; rupture; total shoulder arthroplasty

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