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Int J Med Inform. 2016 Jul;91:44-59. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2016.04.007. Epub 2016 Apr 19.

Smart homes and home health monitoring technologies for older adults: A systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-64 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, T6G 2G4 AB, Canada. Electronic address: lili.liu@ualberta.ca.
2
Department of Computing Science, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta, 307 Athabasca Hall, Edmonton, T6G 2E8 AB, Canada. Electronic address: stroulia@ualberta.ca.
3
Department of Computing Science, Faculty of Science, University of Alberta, 322 Athabasca Hall, Edmonton, T6G 2E8 AB, Canada. Electronic address: yannis@cs.ualberta.ca.
4
Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-64 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, T6G 2G4 AB, Canada; School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Calle 63D # 24-31, 7 de Agosto, Bogotá D.C, Colombia. Electronic address: miguelcr@ualberta.ca.
5
Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-64 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, T6G 2G4 AB, Canada; School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Calle 63D # 24-31, 7 de Agosto, Bogotá D.C, Colombia. Electronic address: aros@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Around the world, populations are aging and there is a growing concern about ways that older adults can maintain their health and well-being while living in their homes.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic literature review to determine: (1) the levels of technology readiness among older adults and, (2) evidence for smart homes and home-based health-monitoring technologies that support aging in place for older adults who have complex needs.

RESULTS:

We identified and analyzed 48 of 1863 relevant papers. Our analyses found that: (1) technology-readiness level for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is low; (2) the highest level of evidence is 1b (i.e., one randomized controlled trial with a PEDro score ≥6); smart homes and home health monitoring technologies are used to monitor activities of daily living, cognitive decline and mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs; (3) there is no evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address disability prediction and health-related quality of life, or fall prevention; and (4) there is conflicting evidence that smart homes and home health monitoring technologies help address chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

The level of technology readiness for smart homes and home health monitoring technologies is still low. The highest level of evidence found was in a study that supported home health technologies for use in monitoring activities of daily living, cognitive decline, mental health, and heart conditions in older adults with complex needs.

KEYWORDS:

Frail elderly; Gerontechnology; Smart homes; Telehealth; eHealth

PMID:
27185508
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2016.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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