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Brain Inj. 2016;30(8):960-8. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2016.1147081. Epub 2016 May 16.

A review of the neuroprotective role of vitamin D in traumatic brain injury with implications for supplementation post-concussion.

Author information

1
a Department of Family & Community Medicine , University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.
2
b Department of Cognitive Neurosciences , Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network (UHN), University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nutritional interventions are promising treatment adjuncts in the management of concussion. Vitamin D (VDH) supplementation has demonstrated neuroprotective properties in multiple models of acquired brain injury.

OBJECTIVE:

Review the neuroprotective role of VDH supplementation following traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHODS:

A Medline search was conducted to review manuscripts investigating the influence of VDH status or supplementation on TBI outcomes.

RESULTS:

The search identified 165 studies, of which five were included. Four manuscripts studied a rodent model of TBI, while one studied a clinical sample. Vitamin D monotherapy independently reduced inflammation and neuronal injury following TBI, with a more robust effect observed in combination with progesterone (PROG). One study demonstrated VDH deficiency exacerbates post-TBI inflammatory response. One study in a clinical sample found combination therapy superior to PROG alone or placebo in improving outcomes after severe TBI. One study observed a more robust response to low-dose VDH compared to high-dose VDH when given in combination with PROG.

CONCLUSION:

A protective role for VDH and a vitamin D sufficient status was identified for numerous outcomes following TBI. However, VDH supplementation cannot be recommended at this time to improve outcomes following TBI.

KEYWORDS:

Concussion; neuroprotection; traumatic brain injury (TBI); vitamin D

PMID:
27185224
DOI:
10.3109/02699052.2016.1147081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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