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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2016 Aug;22(8):1493-1503. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.05.007. Epub 2016 May 14.

Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Screening and Preventive Practice Recommendations from the CIBMTR and EBMT.

Author information

1
Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
2
Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Haematology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Department of Oncology & Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
5
Specialized Cancer Services, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Shefflied, United Kingdom.
6
Department of Medicine, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Maimonides Institute for Biomedical Research at Cordoba (IMIBIC), University of Cordoba, CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain.
7
Florence Nightingale Sisli Hospital, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Unit, Istanbul, Turkey.
8
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
9
National Marrow Donor Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
10
Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.
11
Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, United Kingdom.
12
All Children's Hospital, John Hopkins Medicine, St. Petersburg, Florida.
13
Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
14
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
15
Division of Hematology & Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
16
Division of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
17
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
18
Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy.
19
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
20
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, BMT Program, Department of Medicine, Buffalo, New York.
21
University Pierre & Marie Curie, Paris, France; Hopital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP, Paris, France; INSERM UMRs 938, Paris, France.
22
Department Hematology, Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant, UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts.
23
Saint Louis University, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri.
24
Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
25
Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
26
Department of Hematology, University Hospital Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
27
Hospital Samaritano, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Associação da Medula Ossea - AMEO, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
28
Department of Internal Medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York.
29
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
30
Hematology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
31
Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
32
Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Electronic address: bshaw@doctors.org.uk.

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and all-cause mortality. Long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have a substantial risk of developing MetS and cardiovascular disease, with an estimated prevalence of MetS of 31% to 49% among HCT recipients. Although MetS has not yet been proven to impact cardiovascular risk after HCT, an understanding of the incidence and risk factors for MetS in HCT recipients can provide the foundation to evaluate screening guidelines and develop interventions that may mitigate cardiovascular-related mortality. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to review literature and recommend practices appropriate to HCT recipients. Here we deliver consensus recommendations to help clinicians provide screening and preventive care for MetS and cardiovascular disease among HCT recipients. All HCT survivors should be advised of the risks of MetS and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition and ongoing risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Hematopoietic cell transplantation; Late effects; Metabolic syndrome; Survivorship

PMID:
27184625
PMCID:
PMC4949101
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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