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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Jul;24(7):1561-71. doi: 10.1002/oby.21495. Epub 2016 May 17.

Relationship between body fat and BMI in a US hispanic population-based cohort study: Results from HCHS/SOL.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
3
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.
4
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, UCSD, La Jolla, California, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, Behavioral Medicine Research Center, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, USA.
7
Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
8
Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
9
Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
10
Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA.
11
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
12
Department of Psychiatry and Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the percentage of body fat (%BF)-BMI relationship, identify %BF levels corresponding to adult BMI cut points, and examine %BF-BMI agreement in a diverse Hispanic/Latino population.

METHODS:

%BF by bioelectrical impedance analysis was corrected against %BF by (18) O dilution in 434 participants of the ancillary Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Corrected %BF was regressed against 1/BMI in the parent study (n = 15,261), fitting models for each age group, by sex, and Hispanic/Latino background; predicted %BF was then computed for each BMI cut point.

RESULTS:

Bioelectrical impedance analysis underestimated %BF by 8.7 ± 0.3% in women and 4.6 ± 0.3% in men (P < 0.0001). The %BF-BMI relationship was nonlinear and linear for 1/BMI. Sex- and age-specific regression parameters between %BF and 1/BMI were consistent across Hispanic/Latino backgrounds (P > 0.05). The precision of the %BF-1/BMI association weakened with increasing age in men but not women. The proportion of participants classified as nonobese by BMI but as having obesity by %BF was generally higher among women and older adults (16.4% in women vs. 12.0% in men aged 50-74 years).

CONCLUSIONS:

%BF was linearly related to 1/BMI with consistent relationship across Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. BMI cut points consistently underestimated the proportion of Hispanics/Latinos with excess adiposity.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02060344.

PMID:
27184359
PMCID:
PMC4925254
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21495
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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