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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016 Jul;117(1):56-60.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2016.04.010. Epub 2016 May 13.

Parental timing of allergenic food introduction in urban and suburban populations.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
2
Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
3
Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.
4
Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
5
Montgomery Pediatrics, Cincinnati, Ohio.
6
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. Electronic address: amal.assa'ad@cchmc.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recommendations on timing for introduction of allergenic foods in an infant diet have changed twice during the past decade. How families with different demographic characteristics implement the change has not been studied in the United States.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the age of introduction of allergenic foods between an urban Medicaid-based population and a suburban private insurance-based population in Cincinnati, Ohio.

METHODS:

Two hundred parent surveys were distributed at well-child checkups between 4 and 36 months of age. Data were analyzed using distribution mapping to determine the difference in the age of introduction of infant formula, infant solids, whole cow's milk, eggs, peanut, and fish. Random forest analysis was used to determine the most important factors affecting the age of introduction for both populations.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant difference in the age of infant solid introduction, but urban populations introduced allergenic foods earlier than suburban populations, with a statistically significant difference in the age of introduction of infant formula, whole cow's milk, eggs, peanut, and fish. The most important factor for the timing of all food introductions was the recommended age of introduction from health care professionals.

CONCLUSION:

There is a difference between urban and suburban populations in the timing of introduction of allergenic foods but not in other infant solid foods. The reliance on physician recommendation for both populations supports the need for education and guidance to health care professionals on up-to-date guidance and recommendations.

PMID:
27184198
DOI:
10.1016/j.anai.2016.04.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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